Planning ABC's illustration

V is for Vision

…Vision is imagination capable of inspiring planners and builders to respect the works of today, while moving forward with greater visions of the community of tomorrow. Planning historian Laurence Gerckens offers three examples….

Planning ABC's illustration

I is for Inclusionary

…affordability, this practice resulted in concentric bands of increasing exclusion, with low and moderate income citizens unable to afford homes in lower-density perimeter residential areas. Editor’s note: for more detail on this, see Gerckens‘ PCJ…

Planning ABC's illustration

L is for Land Subdivision

…the mid-19th century, many cities were adopting “Official Maps.” An Official Map illustrated the location of all public buildings, public land, and the alignment of all current and proposed future major streets. After a city…

Planning ABC's illustration

X is for X-Rated Land Uses

…invariably prohibited from locating within specified distances of schools, churches, parks, and other places of public assembly. In addition, zoning ordinances often include conditions such as screening the use and its parking facility from view…

Planning ABC's illustration

K is for Knowledge

…effective public actions. Rational planning assumes the availability of data upon which to make decisions. But in the early 1900s, when the first large-scale modern city plans were created, such data simply did not exist….

Planning ABC's illustration

J is for Justice

…”Justice” implies the execution of public policy through due process of law and in accord with the Constitution and the Bill of Rights. In the American system of justice, the ultimate arbiter is the…

B is for Budget

B is for Budget

…The public aspects of cities include not only services (i.e., police and fire protection, education, and protection of the public health) but also things (i.e., capital goods) that require labor, materials, and finance to…

C is for Comprehensive Plan

C is for Comprehensive Plan

…A community’s comprehensive plan is not just a file cabinet full of plans for future streets; parks and recreation; housing; fire protection; environmental protection; historic preservation; land use zoning; sewers; ground drainage and flood…

Planning ABC's illustration

N is for Neighborhood

…principles in bringing order, functional efficiency, and environmental beauty to a residence-focused organization of buildings, streets, public institutions, and open spaces. Construction of America’s first Garden Suburb, heavily influenced by Hampstead’s example, was begun in…

Planning ABC's illustration

M is for Maps

…patterns; and public utilities and facilities, including schools, police and fire stations, and parklands. Groundbreaking metropolitan planning efforts, such as the 1909 Plan of Chicago overseen by Daniel Burnham, made effective use of this kind…