The Planning Commission at Work

Preparing An Implementable Comprehensive Plan

April 15th, 1995
Article #334

Read an excerpt from this article below. You can download the full article by using the link at the end of the excerpt.

Planning commissions are charged with preparing comprehensive plans. That is one of their core responsibilities. The value of a comprehensive plan, however, lies not in its preparation or its adoption. The real measure of a comprehensive plan is whether the quality of life enjoyed by the residents of a community actually improves as a result of the plan. Thus, a planning commission should be judged according to the degree to which the plan is implemented. In this way, the plan can become a tool of leadership in the community.

The ten questions that follow should help ensure that when your commission develops -- or updates -- the comprehensive plan, you end up with an implementable plan that will improve the quality of life enjoyed by residents of your town, city, or county.

1. Is the plan realistic? A plan should indicate not only what is desirable, but also what is possible, given available resources. Most plans feature a full range of objectives. A good plan will also include the ways and means to measure whether the community actually achieves what the plan calls for. In doing so, the plan becomes a vehicle for resource allocation, as well as managerial accountability.

End of excerpt

... remaining questions discussed in article:

2. Is the plan comprehensive? ...
3. Is the plan specific? ...
4. Is the plan linked with related functions? ...
5. Does the plan link public and private interests? ...
6. Is the plan citizen-focused? ...
7. Is the plan understandable? ...
8. Is the plan problem- and solution-specific? ...
9. Is the plan change-specific? ...
10. Is the plan current? ...

 

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